Honors Courses

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Honors Program Contact

Linda L. Kobylarz
Director, of the Honors Program
203.591.7419
lkobylarz@post.edu

Honors Courses: Spring 2017

These classes represent many disciplines, and as a qualified Honors student, you can pick and choose which courses will best meet your needs and help you to reach your goals. Your advisor can work with you one-on-one to find what works best for you.

ACC211.06 Managerial Accounting

Professor Sharon Huxley, M.B.A.
Professor of Accounting

This course provides a practical understanding of the use of accounting data driven processes by management in planning and controlling operations in all functions of the enterprise and in choosing among alternative courses of action. Prerequisite: ACC111.

ACC341.06 Intermediate Accounting III

Professor Noelle Taddei, M.S., CPA
Associate Professor of Accounting

This course studies the accounting treatment of and measurement for leases, pension and post-employment benefits, income taxes, cash flows, share based compensation, earnings per share, accounting changes and error correction. Prerequisite: ACC340.

ART102.06 Art History II

Professor Tracy Collamore, M.F.A.
Associate Faculty

This course provides an introduction to the history of the visual arts from the Renaissance to the Twentieth-Century. It presents a chronological coverage of architecture, sculpture, painting and graphic arts, stressing the characteristics that identify periods and styles.

ART413.06 Art Travel Seminar

Professor John Rohlfing, M.F.A.
Professor of Art
This course provides an overview of the history and culture of the destination country in preparation for travel to that country. Students will develop familiarity with the political and historical background of the country where the travel will take place. Students will become conversant with the cultural ecology of the country pertaining to the production of art and architecture.

BIO144.06 General Biology II

Dylan Clyne, Ph.D.
Academic Program Manager, Biology

General Biology II is designed for both the major and non-major college student and provides a continuation of the foundation established in BIO143. Discussions will focus on DNA, gene structure, function and expression, biotechnology, developmental biology, evolution, population genetics and dynamics, species interactions, biological communities, and vertebrate anatomy and physiology. Inquiry based study in the concurrent laboratory component will provide hands-on application of appropriate lecture material. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO143, or permission of the Academic Department.

BUS340.06 Business Ethics

Professor Susan McKernan, Ed.D.
Associate Faculty
This course examines the ethical issues and dilemmas that challenge the business leader, the business organization, and the capitalist system. Emphasis is on the development of an ethical culture based in fairness, honesty and persistence. Cases, readings, and discussions serve to integrate ethical reflection with management decision-making.
Prerequisite: MGT105.

BUS411.06 Business Policy Seminar

Professor Thomas Abbott , M.B.A. (Ed.D. candidate)
Academic Program Manager, Business Administration and International Business Administration
This seminar requires students to utilize concepts presented in all prior business and economics courses in analyzing corporate business strategies. Students will focus on strategic thinking, leadership, and understanding the interconnected nature of all business activity. The course examines how businesses plan and react to factors affecting their success. Emphasis is placed on best practices and change management processes. Simulations and case studies are used with the goal of allowing students to develop and present their mastery of strategic business issues. Oral and written reports are required.
Prerequisite: Senior standing in an undergraduate business program.
CIS112.06

CIS112.06 Introduction to Computing

Professor Antonio Evertez, B.B.A., M.S.A.
Associate Faculty

This course strives to meet the high level of computer literacy required of all students earning a degree for the university. Special emphasis is placed on the ethical use of computer technology for information analysis and communications. Computer units introduce the Internet, MS Windows, word processing, spreadsheets and presentation software.

COM107.06 Introduction to Communication

Professor Ann Marie Somma, M.F.A.
Associate Faculty
This introductory course will focus on the knowledge and skills that students need to become competent communicators. This information and these skills will include speaking, listening, media literacy, computer-mediated communication, cultural sensitivity, workplace communication, group dynamics, and critical thinking. Students will prepare and present speeches and group projects that utilize media and technology. Emphasis will be placed on personal, social and workplace interaction, both individually and in group settings.

CRJ302.06 Criminal Procedure

Professor Sandra Wilson, J.D.
Academic Program Manager, Criminal Justice
This course is a survey and analysis of the due process rights of individuals in the criminal process. Emphasis is on the impact of the Bill of Rights on the practices of police, prosecutors and judges, and the remedies available for the violation of those rights. Prerequisite: CRJ209.

EMH201.06 Risk and Vulnerability Assessment

Robert McGarry, M.S.
Associate Faculty
This course will provide the student with a solid foundation in risk and vulnerability assessment. The course will compare and contrast different risk and vulnerability assessment models, outlining critical components of each. Students will use best practices and lessons learned to analyze and apply models for planning and implementing protective measures for people, facilities, and critical infrastructure.

ENG130.06 Literature and Composition

Professor Jeffrey Talbot, M.A.
Associate Faculty

Students develop skills in critical stance, persuasion, and appreciation of literary genres such as nonfiction, drama, poetry, film, and short stories. Additionally, students apply literary response methodologies to interpret, connect, and respond to analytical queries through persuasive and responsive writing.

Prerequisite: ENG110.

ENG311.06 Creative Writing

Professor Kristin Santa Maria, M.F.A.
Assistant Academic Program Manager, English
This course provides extensive imaginative writing of description, dialogue, poetry, and narrative. The course is designed for students who write readily but need direction and consultation. Prerequisite: ENG130.

EQU166.06 Facility Design and Operation

Catherine Eagleston, B.S.
Associate Faculty
This course examines the planning, construction, maintenance, and operation of equestrian facilities. Barn placement, design, and layout are covered in detail, considering such factors as environmental concerns, drainage, ventilation, efficiency, safety and fire prevention, pastures, fencing, maintenance procedures, and purchasing and storing feed. Also covered are record keeping, insurance requirements; and selection, training and management of staff. EQU166L is a practical ‘lab’ component corequisite to this course, enabling students to experience real-life applications of the concepts in a variety of settings.

EQU252.06 Equine Nutrition

Professor Abigail Nemec, M.Ed.
Director, Equine Studies
This course involves an examination of the nutrients needed by the horse and the various feeds that can be combined to meet the requirements of an equine diet. The course also includes a survey of varying feed management practices and programs that meet the needs of individual horses in work/competition or at pasture, for growth, reproduction, maintenance, and old age. Also addressed are parasites, plant toxicity, and feed quality and labeling. Nutrition-related diseases are studied with emphasis on prevention.

EQU403.06 Equine Senior Seminar

Professor Abigail Nemec, M.Ed.
Director, Equine Studies
This course is the culminating course for the Equine major. It provides the opportunity for the student to plan, research, and complete an individual capstone project under the close supervision of a faculty member. Students will present the design and results of their work both in writing and orally within the class, with the opportunity to present for a public audience as well. This course requires students to integrate and apply the knowledge and skills gained throughout the degree program, developing a project that has the potential to create lasting change within the equine industry. Collaboration with others is a key component of this project development. Prerequisites: Senior Standing, and Writing in the Discipline course.

LAW405.06 Environmental Law and Practice

Professor Peter Chepya, J.D.
Program Manager, Legal Studies
Students learn the relevant federal and state environmental laws together with their practical applications to corporate and real estate transactions. Specific areas of study include environmental due diligence. This course covers the specific area in which individuals and business entities encounter environmental law. Prerequisite: ENV121 or LAW101 or LAW/BUS204.

MAT220.06 Statistics I

Professor Vivian Simmons, M.Ed.
Assistant Academic Program Manager, Mathematics

This course offers students an opportunity to experience statistics as it would occur in various settings. This course is integrated with a state of the art online program designed to assist students in achieving their goals of high level performance in and out of the classroom. Topics are presented through real life case studies and include an overview of the fundamentals of statistics, collective and descriptive statistic techniques, data collection and sampling, the normal distribution and probability, hypothesis testing, population inferences, simple linear regression, and correlation. An understanding of basic algebra is required. Scientific or graphing calculator and access to a spreadsheet program is recommended.

MAT220.08 Statistics I

Professor Christopher Carbone, M.A.
Associate Faculty
This course offers students an opportunity to experience statistics as it would occur in various settings. This course is integrated with a state of the art online program designed to assist students in achieving their goals of high level performance in and out of the classroom. Topics are presented through real life case studies and include an overview of the fundamentals of statistics, collective and descriptive statistic techniques, data collection and sampling, the normal distribution and probability, hypothesis testing, population inferences, simple linear regression, and correlation. An understanding of basic algebra is required. Scientific or graphing calculator and access to a spreadsheet program is recommended.

MGT105.06 Principles of Management

Professor Donald Nowill, Ph.D.
Associate Faculty

This course is an introduction to the principles of management examining their application in public and private, profit and non-profit organizations. Students will explore the areas of employee motivation, group behavior, leadership, strategic planning, organizational design, and career opportunities. Fundamental concepts of management, effective communication competency, ethical dilemmas faced by managers and corporate social responsibility will be explored.

SOC210.06 Social Inequality

Professor Sharnetta Baker, M.A.
Associate Faculty
An examination of the causes and consequences of inequality historically and cross-culturally in America and around the world, including difference in wealth, power and prestige. Also considered are the factors of race, ethnicity, age, and gender in social inequality. Prerequisite: SOC101.